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What is your next step in Continuous Delivery? Part 1

27 Aug, 2014

Continuous Delivery helps you deliver software faster, with better quality and at lower cost. Who doesn’t want to delivery software faster, better and cheaper? I certainly want that!
No matter how good you are at Continuous Delivery, you can always do one step better. Even if you are as good as Google or Facebook, you can still do one step better. Myself included, I can do one step better.
But also if you are just getting started with Continuous Delivery, there is a feasible step to take you forward.
In this series, I describe a plan that helps you determine where you are right now and what your next step should be. To be complete, I’ll start at the very beginning. I expect most of you have passed the first steps already.

The steps you already took

This is the first part in the series: What is your next step in Continuous Delivery? I’ll start with three steps combined in a single post. This is because the great majority of you has gone through these steps already.

Step 0: Your very first lines of code

Do you remember the very first lines of code you wrote? Perhaps as a student or maybe before that as a teenager? Did you use version control? Did you bring it to a test environment before going to production? I know I did not.
None of us was born with an innate skills for delivering software in a certain way. However, many of us are taught a certain way of delivering software that still is a long way from Continuous Delivery.

Step 1: Version control

At some point during your study of career, you have been introduced to Version Control. I remember starting with CVS, migrating to Subversion and I am currently using Git. Each of these systems are an improvement over te previous one.
It is common to store the source code for your software in version control. Do you already have definitions or scripts for your infrastructure in version control? And for your automated acceptance tests or database schemas? In later steps, we’ll get back to that.

Step 2: Release process

Your current release process may be far from Continuous Delivery. Despite appearances, your current release process is a useful step towards Continuous Delivery.
Even if you delivery to production less than twice a year, you are better off than a company that delivers their code unpredictably, untested and unmanaged. Or worse, a company that edits their code directly on a production machine.
In your delivery process, you have planning, control, a production-like testing environment, actual testing and maintenance after the go-live. The main difference with Continuous Delivery is the frequency and the amount of software that is released at the same time.
So yes, a release process is a productive step towards Continuous Delivery. Now let’s see if we can optimize beyond this manual release process.

Step 3: Scripts

Imagine you have issues on your production server… Who do you go to for help? Do you have someone in mind?
Let me guess, you are thinking about a middle-aged guy who has been working at your organisation for 10+ years. Even if your organization is only 3 years old, I bet he’s been working there for more than 10 years. Or at least, it seems like it.
My next guess is that this guy wrote some scripts to automate recurring tasks and make his life easier. Am I right?
These scripts are an important step towards Continuous Delivery. in fact, Continuous Delivery is all about automating repetitive tasks. The only thing that falls short is that these scripts are a one-man-initiative. It is a good initiative, but there is no strategy behind it and a lack of management support.
If you don’t have this guy working for you, then you may have a bigger step to take when continuing towards the next step of Continuous Delivery. To successfully adopt Continuous Delivery on the long run, you are going to need someone like him.

Following steps

In the next parts, we will look at the following steps towards becoming world champion delivering software:

  • Step 4: Continuous Delivery
  • Step 5: Continuous Deployment
  • Step 6: “Hands-off”
  • Step 7: High Scalability

Stay tuned for the following posts.

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