Automatic database sharding with Alibaba Cloud Table Store

At some point in your application’s lifecycle, there might come a time when you need to start scaling your data storage. If you are storing media files or other blobs that have no relations between them, you can easily add storage capacity to solve the problem. For (semi-)structured data in a database however, scaling is a whole different story. Simply adding database instances is not enough. You will need to reconsider the usage patterns and decide what solution solves the problem you have. If your database is hitting resource limits because it is accessed very frequently, adding an asynchronous read replica might be the way to go. If the size of the data is the issue and lookups become very slow, you might consider sharding your database.

Read more

A quest in finding the perfect EventStorming backpack

Over recent years, a tool called EventStorming became one of the go-to techniques for Domain-Driven Design consultants to collaboratively explore complex business domains at customers. Since consultants travel a lot from company to company helping with their questions about approaching software delivery this poses a small 1st world problem; How can we still comfortably travel while still carrying the required equipment to do an EventStorming at the customer (without breaking our back or needing a personal fitness coach). This was exactly the conversation we, Maxime Sanglan-Charlier and Kenny Baas-Schwegler, had during DDD Europe 2019. In this post, Maxime and Kenny will share their quest in finding the perfect EventStorming backpack.

Read more →

Cypress and TestCafé a comparison – part two: In-dept comparison

This blog is part of a series about comparing Cypress and TestCafé.
In part 1 (link) I introduced both of the frameworks with some examples of how they work, epic features and more.

In this part of the series, I will give you a straight-forward comparison of the 2 frameworks which hopefully will help you in your quest to find the best framework that suites your ambitions.
If you have any remarks about the content, please feel free to contact me.

Read more →

Shut the door and listen from outside

At a certain point, you start to finish each other’s statements. Teams that have been together for a while can breed a sort of shorthand in their communication. This has a lot of upsides, but it can also cause, for example, predictable retrospectives. Retrospectives should trigger learning and improvement. When they become predictable I feel I’m missing out on something important. Is the forced recurrence a trigger for sameness, should we be doing retrospectives whenever we have an opportunity for learning? Or maybe it’s me, am I causing the predictability? Should I…

Read more →

Asynchronous workflow pattern

The asynchronous workflow pattern, also known as the publish-subscribe pattern, is an architecture pattern which is typically used to asynchronously perform resource intensive and time consuming tasks. To separate the request from the task itself we can use a queue where the sender puts messages that another service can pick up.

This pattern is a subset of the CQRS (Command-Query Responsibility Segregation) pattern. CQRS defines a clear separation of a command and query model [MF-CQRS], while the asynchronous workflow pattern only defines a command model without caring how the result of a command is being read.

Read more…

A simple, effective test automation strategy

In my whitepaper I wrote about different types of testing and what to consider when choosing a test automation strategy. More than a few readers asked how to put this advice into practice, and a good friend inspired me to write another blog post about it.

DevOps teams automate everything. When you’re getting started with test automation, it’s important to wonder why someone would want to automate tests. And what is testing, anyway? This article describes what testing is and what parts of that process can be automated. Fortunately, there’s no way test automation will eliminate manual testing; it will just make that process more efficient.

Read more →

Monitoring AWS EKS audit logs with Falco

Background

AWS recently announced the possibility to send control plane logs from their managed Kubernetes service (EKS) to CloudWatch. Amongst those logs are the API server audit events, which provide an important security trail regarding interactions with your EKS cluster

Sysdig Falco is an open-source CNCF project that is specifically designed to monitor the behavior of containers and applications. Besides monitoring container run-time behavior, it can also inspect the Kubernetes audit events for non-compliant interactions based on a predefined set of rules.

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could automatically monitor your EKS audit events with Falco? In this blog post we will show you how to make this work.

Read more →

Share This