Kubernetes in the cloud: the 6 best options

The container wars are over. Kubernetes has won. The fact that Docker even integrates it in it’s desktop version says enough. But creating and maintaining a K8S cluster is still hard. You need to know a lot of the internals of Kubernetes, like etcd, overlay networking and more. And you need to be an expert in all the components: ingress, configmaps, pods and so on. So think twice before creating and managing your own cluster. Instead, choose one of the managed Kubernetes services.

Running Kubernetes in the cloud

Until a few months ago, your best (and probably only) option to run a cluster in the cloud was GKE. But things have changed. There are a lot of viable alternatives. So I decided to write a blog about these alternatives. In my blog I cover Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), Tectonic by CoreOs, Azure Container Service (AKS), Openshift by Red Hat and Rancher 2.0. All of  them are fully managed and take care of upgrading, scaling and monitoring your cluster. And if you reall want to run your own Kubernetes, take a look at the various tools that exist to spin up a cluster. These tools are maturing pretty quickly. Just keep in mind: managing a cluster is harder than just creating one!

Read more on the blogpost on Instruqt

Learning by doing

If you want to try out Kubernetes yourself, learn more about it on Instruqt. It offers online courses and tracks for DevOps tools and Cloud services. By solving challenges, you will learn new stuff by doing, instead of watching video’s or following boring tutorials. Try it out for yourself and create an account on Instruqt. And please let us know what you think, we love to get your feedback. And if you are interested in using Instruqt in your company, let’s get a coffee!

Kubernetes on Instruqt

A screenshot of the online course for Kubernetes

 

Is Scrum Agile and is Agile Scrum?

2 minutes read

drawing by Alexander Koffeman

(drawing by Alexander)

 

The short version: yes and no! Scrum is Agile but Agile is not (only) Scrum.

 

Future Fit Organizations

Organizations want to become flexible and Agile or as we like to call it at Xebia: Future Fit. Just like when you go to the gym and want to become fitter. Yes, there are more ways to achieve that.

You can see Agile as a container for multiple ways of working. In case of the gym there are many sport activities you can do. Scrum is one of the frameworks that could help you to become more Agile. Besides Scrum there are more sport programs (Kanban, DSDM, XP) that supports the organization to become Agile.

That`s just the basic explanation, but Agile is a lot more than just a container. Agile is about mindset, the way you think, the values that you live by. You can read more about Agile in the Agile Manifesto.

Experiential Learning

Scrum is simple to understand and difficult to master. In practice this means that it will take time to really understand why each component within the framework serves a specific purpose and is essential to Scrum’s success and usage. With Scrum you work in short iterations named “Sprints”. At the end of every Sprint you deliver a potentially releasable product increment. The core of Scrum is based on empiricism. That means that you will decide on actual experiential learnings what you will do next. This will show in Scrum on the following three pillars: transparency, inspect and adapt. Everything within Scrum is interwoven with these aspects. For example the Sprint Retrospective is the moment for the Scrum team to look back at the Sprint (inspect) to see if they can improve (adapt). You can read more details about Scrum in the Scrum Guide.

In my next blogpost you can read more about Scrum. Hope that this helps you to explain the difference between Agile and Scrum!

Please let me know if this helps you and drop a comment below!

The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 8: Environment-as-code pipeline and individual pipeline

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the last blogpost of this series I want to talk about Environment-as-code pipeline and individual pipelines.
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The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 7: Explicit dependency management

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the seventh blogpost of this series I want to talk about Explicit Dependency Management.

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The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 6: Dealing with secrets

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the sixth blogpost of this series I want to talk about Dealing with secrets.
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The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 5: Secure Containerized Delivery

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the fifth blogpost of this series I want to talk about Secure Containerized Delivery.
Read more →

The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 4: Group Managed Service Accounts

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the fourth blogpost of this series I want to talk about Group Managed Service Accounts.
Read more →

The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 3: Keep your Windows Containers up-to-date

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the third blogpost of this series I want to talk about Keeping your Windows Containers up-to-date.
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The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 2: Multi-stage builds

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the second blogpost of this series I want to talk about
Multi-stage builds.
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The eight practices for Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack – PRACTICE 1: Small, reusable image layers

This post is originally published as article within SDN Magazine on October 13th, 2017.

During the past year I supported several clients in their journey toward Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack. In this blogseries I’d like to share the eight practices I learned while practicing Containerized Delivery on the Microsoft stack using Docker, both in a Greenfield and in a Brownfield situation. In the first blogpost of this series I want to talk about the first practice: Small and reusable image layers.
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