Example Mapping – Steering the conversation

People who are familiar with BDD and ATDD already know how useful the three amigos (product owner, tester and developer) session is for talking about what the system under development is supposed to do. But somehow these refinement sessions seem to drain the group’s energy. One of the problems I see is not having a clear structure for conversations.

Example Mapping is the brainchild of Matt Wynne. He created a simple technique that can steer the conversation into breaking down any product backlog items within 30 minutes.

Read more →

Future of Testing and Automation: The role of the tester in 2020

Last week, the first TestWorks Conf was held in Amsterdam. This hands-on conference featured a plethora of test automation tools and allowed the participants to gain practical experience with them. Since we feel and expect that all participants will take next steps towards improving their test automation practices, we decided to take a glance into the future and discuss the future of testing and automation together with Alan Richardson.

In a series of blogposts, we would like to share parts of our vision on testing and automation in the near future. First stop will be: the role of the tester in 2020.

Read more →

Then When Given

People who practice ATDD all know how frustrating it can be to write automated examples. Especially when you get stuck overthinking the preconditions of examples.

This post describes an alternative approach to writing acceptance tests: write them backwards!

Read more →

Hands-on Test Automation Tools session wrap up – Part1

Last week we had our first Hands-on Test Automation sessions.
Developers and Testers were challenged to show and tell their experiences in Test Automation.
That resulted in lots of in depth discussions and hands-on Test Automation Tool shoot-outs.

In this blogpost we’ll share the outcome of the different sessions, like the famous Cucumber vs. FitNesse debat.

Stay tuned for upcoming updates!

Read more →

Are Testers still relevant?

Last week I talked to one of my colleagues about a tester in his team. He told me that the tester was bored, because he had nothing to do. All the developers wrote and executed their tests themselves. Which makes sense, because the tester 2.0 tries to make the team test infected.

So what happens if every developer in the team has the Testivus? Are you still relevant on the Continuous Delivery train?
Come and join the discussion at the Open Kitchen Test Automation: Are you still relevant?

Read more →

Dealing with bad news

Couple of weeks ago I realised something. As an Agile tester it’s really hard to communicate bugs! Testers are known for bringing bad news, but it is not easy to do it correctly. Specially when you’re in a Scrum Team and the heat is really on with bugs or issues flying all around.

Read more →