At my current client, we have a large AngularJS application that is configured to show a full-page error whenever one of the $http requests ends up in error. This is implemented with an error interceptor as you would expect it to be. However, we’re also using some calculation-intense resources that happen to timeout once in a while. This combination is tricky: a user triggers a resource request when navigating to a certain page, navigates to a second page and suddenly ends up with an error message, as the request from the first page triggered a timeout error. This is a particular unpleasant side effect that I’m going to address in a generic way in this post.

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